MAY 2019



MAY 2019


Utilizing a diverse range of found materials,

Marine Serre’s Spring/Summer 2019 collection introduces new designs that preserve

the brand’s aesthetic integrity without denying the origin of the repurposed fabrics. Choosing to define her practice as ‘up cycling,'

Serre draws attention to the importance of managing a brand that is self-critical and hyper-aware of the need for sustainability within the fashion industry.

The collection transforms prototypical silhouettes by constructing garments out of fabrics traditionally used in outerwear,

allowing the pieces to perform both a utilitarian and stylistic purpose. Skin-tight leggings and long-sleeve shirts conceal more than half of the skin,

offering protection from solar radiation. Midi dresses are embellished with cargo pockets,

creating a logic of repetition that emphasizes the importance of combative clothing.

Visually, the clothing possesses ominous qualities,

subtly alluding to ideas of mutation and adaptation within

anthropogenic discourse.

 


CONSUMERISM

IN THE AGE OF SUSTAINABILITY

A CONVERSATION WITH SPENCER PHIPPS

APRIL 2019

Utilizing a diverse range of found materials, Marine Serre’s Spring/Summer 2019 collection introduces new designs that preserve the brand’s aesthetic integrity without denying the origin of the repurposed fabrics.Choosing to define her practice as ‘up cycling,’Serre draws attention to the importance of managing a brand that is self-critical and hyper-aware of the need for sustainability within the fashion industry. The collection transforms prototypical silhouettes by constructing garments out of fabrics traditionally used in outerwear, allowing the pieces to perform both a utilitarian and stylistic purpose. Skin-tight leggings and long-sleeve shirts conceal more than half of the skin, offering protection from solar radiation. Midi dresses are embellished with cargo pockets, creating a logic of repetition that emphasizes the importance of combative clothing.Visually, the clothing possesses ominous qualities, subtly alluding to ideas of mutation and adaptation within anthropogenic discourse.

 


CONSUMERISM

IN THE AGE OF SUSTAINABILITY

A CONVERSATION WITH SPENCER PHIPPS

APRIL 2019

PHIPPS INTERNATIONAL was started in 2017 by Spencer Phipps. Born and raised in San Francisco, he studied at Parsons School of Design in New York City graduating in 2008 with a nomination as “designer of the year” for his final year collection - an initial exploration of sustainable fashion. He started his career at Marc Jacobs as part of the menswear design team and after, relocated to Antwerp to work with Dries Van Noten as the first American menswear designer. He is currently shortlisted for the 2019 LVMH Prize.

"Making anything new is not sustainable. There’s already enough stuff in the world. But…if you’re going to buy something new, do it well, do it nicely, do it responsibly. I think that’s the only thing you can do nowadays."

PHIPPS INTERNATIONAL was started in 2017 by Spencer Phipps. Born and raised in San Francisco, he studied at Parsons School of Design in New York City graduating in 2008 with a nomination as “designer of the year” for his final year collection - an initial exploration of sustainable fashion. He started his career at Marc Jacobs as part of the menswear design team and after, relocated to Antwerp to work with Dries Van Noten as the first American menswear designer. He is currently shortlisted for the 2019 LVMH Prize.

"Making anything new is not sustainable. There’s already enough stuff in the world. But…if you’re going to buy something new, do it well, do it nicely, do it responsibly. I think that’s the only thing you can do nowadays."

H. Lorenzo applauds Phipps’ platform of confronting the lack of sustainability rampant among other brands and the industry as a whole. Outside of the environmentalist lens, are there other unhealthy industry practices that Phipps actively engages against, while simultaneously incorporating this pushback into the spirit of the brand?

 

It’s not a practice so much as an attitude that I’ve found really rampant in the fashion industry—that fashion works in a vacuum and that it’s more important than anything else. Which I think is really old fashioned, acting like you’re doing the most important job in the world. We should all just enjoy it and acknowledge the human aspect of it. We at Phipps are really trying to keep everything accessible and keep everything fun and conscious about the rest of the world.

PHIPPS SS19 Mood Board Images / Courtesy Of: Spencer Phipps

"[...] in researching this old sort of 'vintage Americana,' there were color palettes that were a bit popular in the late 60’s. Back to school, very educational colors, very simple in what they were referencing. That was part of the message that we wanted—make learning fun, and keep it simple."

Is it a paradox to be a fashion label that champions environmentalism? How do you maintain ecologically sound practices and promote sustainability while also ensuring brand growth?

 

Making anything new is not sustainable. There’s already enough stuff in the world. But…if you’re going to buy something new, do it well, do it nicely, do it responsibly. I think that’s the only thing you can do nowadays.

 

You end up saying no to a lot of products or fabrics or certain things that you want to make just because you can’t guarantee that they’re going to be made responsibly. We try and do as much on our end to make the best possible products that are made with the best possible methods. To promote growth we try and make sure that what we’re doing is good and useful, and that is as much as we can do between us and the customers. If you build it, they will come.

What is your approach to building a collection?

 

Research, reading, talking, buying in old vintage shops and markets. Each collection is focused on a different area of natural sciences, and within that framework we do a lot of research. For example, last season was all about physics and the way that physics impacts your life. I was reading a lot of books about quantum physics and astrophysics and talking to experts about physics.

If you were not a fashion designer, what would you be pursuing?

 

I think realistically if I wasn’t doing fashion, I probably would have disappeared into the mountains and just gotten a job at a ski resort, become a guide, whatever. I like being outside too much [laughs].

Interview: Kyle Chen

Photos/Video Courtesy Of: Spencer Phipps

FEATURING: PHIPPS


H. Lorenzo applauds Phipps’ platform of confronting the lack of sustainability rampant among other brands and the industry as a whole. Outside of the environmentalist lens, are there other unhealthy industry practices that Phipps actively engages against, while simultaneously incorporating this pushback into the spirit of the brand?

 

It’s not a practice so much as an attitude that I’ve found really rampant in the fashion industry—that fashion works in a vacuum and that it’s more important than anything else. Which I think is really old fashioned, acting like you’re doing the most important job in the world. We should all just enjoy it and acknowledge the human aspect of it. We at Phipps are really trying to keep everything accessible and keep everything fun and conscious about the rest of the world.

PHIPPS SS19 Mood Board Images / Courtesy Of: Spencer Phipps

"[...] in researching this old sort of 'vintage Americana,' there were color palettes that were a bit popular in the late 60’s. Back to school, very educational colors, very simple in what they were referencing. That was part of the message that we wanted—make learning fun, and keep it simple."

Is it a paradox to be a fashion label that champions environmentalism? How do you maintain ecologically sound practices and promote sustainability while also ensuring brand growth?

 

Making anything new is not sustainable. There’s already enough stuff in the world. But…if you’re going to buy something new, do it well, do it nicely, do it responsibly. I think that’s the only thing you can do nowadays.

 

You end up saying no to a lot of products or fabrics or certain things that you want to make just because you can’t guarantee that they’re going to be made responsibly. We try and do as much on our end to make the best possible products that are made with the best possible methods. To promote growth we try and make sure that what we’re doing is good and useful, and that is as much as we can do between us and the customers. If you build it, they will come.

What is your approach to building a collection?

 

Research, reading, talking, buying in old vintage shops and markets. Each collection is focused on a different area of natural sciences, and within that framework we do a lot of research. For example, last season was all about physics and the way that physics impacts your life. I was reading a lot of books about quantum physics and astrophysics and talking to experts about physics.

If you were not a fashion designer, what would you be pursuing?

 

I think realistically if I wasn’t doing fashion, I probably would have disappeared into the mountains and just gotten a job at a ski resort, become a guide, whatever. I like being outside too much [laughs].

Interview: Kyle Chen

Photos/Video Courtesy Of: Spencer Phipps

FEATURING: PHIPPS


FEATURING: SIES MARJAN, LEO


FEATURING: SIES MARJAN, LEO