In lieu of clothing—and consequently obscuring—the human body, Craig Green chose to bare the physique, or rather, its essence. Spring 2020 strips down his design archetypes and tosses them about in biological tones of pink, blue, and green. Work jackets and trousers are reincarnated in an ultra-thin nylon film, almost akin to membrane, and quilted at the forearms, shoulders, and shins—a vague and all-too-human intermediate between organic and athletic. Cagoules flaunt lustrous appliqués across their torsos,

stitched with lines of abdominal musculature and “fireworks” that evoke pressure points and chakras alike. Below, silk hands hang freely from wrist straps, waving their open palms in the universal human gesture of transparency. And through the embroidered holes on his loop-face hoodies, Green suggests that a return to exposure, a glimpse of skin, is a necessary pilgrimage after a lifetime of covering up.

FEATURING: CRAIG GREEN


 

 

During the summer of 2019, amidst the clamor of brands and houses pushing their runways and lookbooks down the press’s throats, Masayuki Ino of Doublet was noticeably absent. He had wordlessly taken leave from previewing his upcoming collection, leaving devotees slightly taken aback. It was a good move in retrospect; the curiosity that built around the SS20 collection, titled “HIDE AND SHOW”, only furthers the wonder and enthusiasm that Doublet regularly generates. And how fitting it is, that Ino took respite to “HIDE” a collection and then spring it upon us with a magician’s flourish, waving quick-change scarves and dangling embroidery yarn keys before our eyes. Fashion, he posits, is communication, and every piece of the collection is designed with a “hidden talent” that the wearer can “SHOW”—or not, as they please. From lenticular trench coats that alternately conceal and reveal based on viewing angle, to long-yoke shirts with extra-spacious shoulder blocks allowing for impromptu portraiture, the offerings gracefully walk the line between innovation and gimmick, more charming than contrived. Above all, the clothes are accessories for self-discovery, incorporating bits of well-loved nostalgia with an encouraging push to express yourself—in the words of Doublet, “We would be happy if you could show your talent through these clothes!”

 
 
 
 
 

 

 

FEATURING: DOUBLET


In lieu of clothing—and consequently obscuring—the human body, Craig Green chose to bare the physique, or rather, its essence. Spring 2020 strips down his design archetypes and tosses them about in biological tones of pink, blue, and green. Work jackets and trousers are reincarnated in an ultra-thin nylon film, almost akin to membrane, and quilted at the forearms, shoulders, and shins—a vague and all-too-human intermediate between organic and athletic. Cagoules flaunt lustrous appliqués across their torsos, stitched with lines of abdominal musculature and “fireworks” that evoke pressure points and chakras alike. Below, silk hands hang freely from wrist straps, waving their open palms in the universal human gesture of transparency. And through the embroidered holes on his loop-face hoodies, Green suggests that a return to exposure, a glimpse of skin, is a necessary pilgrimage after a lifetime of covering up.

FEATURING: CRAIG GREEN


 

During the summer of 2019, amidst the clamor of brands and houses pushing their runways and lookbooks down the press’s throats, Masayuki Ino of Doublet was noticeably absent. He had wordlessly taken leave from previewing his upcoming collection, leaving devotees slightly taken aback. It was a good move in retrospect; the curiosity that built around the SS20 collection, titled “HIDE AND SHOW”, only furthers the wonder and enthusiasm that Doublet regularly generates. And how fitting it is, that Ino took respite to “HIDE” a collection and then spring it upon us with a magician’s flourish, waving quick-change scarves and dangling embroidery yarn keys before our eyes. Fashion, he posits, is communication, and every piece of the collection is designed with a “hidden talent” that the wearer can “SHOW”—or not, as they please. From lenticular trench coats that alternately conceal and reveal based on viewing angle, to long-yoke shirts with extra-spacious shoulder blocks allowing for impromptu portraiture, the offerings gracefully walk the line between innovation and gimmick, more charming than contrived. Above all, the clothes are accessories for self-discovery, incorporating bits of well-loved nostalgia with an encouraging push to express yourself—in the words of Doublet, “We would be happy if you could show your talent through these clothes!”

FEATURING: DOUBLET